close

Kontakt

hessische Film- und Medienakademie (hFMA)
Hermann-Steinhäuser-Straße 43-47, 2.OG
63065 Offenbach am Main

Anfahrtsbeschreibung hier

Sie erreichen uns Montags bis Freitags von 10 bis 16:30 Uhr.

kommiss. Geschäftsführung
Lara Nahrwold (montags bis freitags) – nahrwold(at)hfmakademie.de

Mitarbeiter*innen
Csongor Dobrotka (mittwochs) – dobrotka(at)hfmakademie.de
Celina Schimmer (montags bis donnerstags) – schimmer(at)hfmakademie.de

Termin

(Öffentlich)

Film, Event, Vortrag

Frankfurt am Main

Lecture & Film: EL BRUTO

Achtung, veränderte Öffnungszeiten! Alle Veranstaltungen ab Dezember 2022 beginnen um 20 Uhr!
In der „Lecture & Film“-Reihe Kino am Abgrund der Moderne führen namhafte Expert:innen aus Europa und den USA in die vielfältigen Facetten von Buñuels Werk ein. 
Termin:
Donnerstag, 27. April 2023, 20 Uhr im Kino des DFF

Film: EL BRUTO, Mexiko 1953, 83 Min.

Lecture: Gaston Lillo...

Mehr erfahren

Achtung, veränderte Öffnungszeiten! Alle Veranstaltungen ab Dezember 2022 beginnen um 20 Uhr!

In der „Lecture & Film“-Reihe Kino am Abgrund der Moderne führen namhafte Expert:innen aus Europa und den USA in die vielfältigen Facetten von Buñuels Werk ein. 


Termin:
Donnerstag, 27. April 2023, 20 Uhr im Kino des DFF

Film: EL BRUTO, Mexiko 1953, 83 Min.

Lecture: Gaston Lillo (Ottawa), Melodrama in El Bruto: An Aesthetics of Astonishment
Vortrag in französischer Sprache mit Übersetzung


Among the roughly twenty films that Buñuel made during the course of his Mexican period, some, like LOS OLVIDADOS (1950), EL ÁNGEL EXTERMINADOR (1962) and NAZARÍN (1959), have enjoyed a positive critical reception and won international prizes, contributing to the director’s prestigious image. However, other films from this time, such as EL GRAN CALAVERA (1949), SUSANA (1951) and EL BRUTO (1953), were considered as films made “for pecuniary reasons”, containing “inexplicable concessions” and “without great aesthetic interest”. On the basis of the reevaluation which the melodrama has undergone in recent years (thanks in part to the writings of Peter Brooks) and the growing theoretical interest in the importance of the affective dimension of texts, I will show how EL BRUTO uses the narrative and thematic resources of the melodrama outside of a pejorative, mocking ethos, typical of irony, while pointing towards an ethical and ideological horizon contrary to that which characterized the Mexican melodrama films of the era. At the same time, I will show that the film, through its “emotional pull”, activates mechanisms of subjectivation which distance it from the subjective interpellation of the then dominant Mexican discourse.

Gaston Lillo is professor of modern languages and literatures at the University of Ottawa.

Video-play-button
    Pause
      /
    Button-tray-up